Mobile Crushers Go Where the Work Is

Mobile crushers can reduce rock, concrete, and other debris to the size of gravel, and they can maneuver themselves around a work site—but not at the same time. That’s how these dual-purpose machines can get away with having a single hydraulic power unit.

If the mountain won’t come to Muhammed, then Muhammed must go to the mountain. That’s the principle behind mobile material crushers. Large, stationary crushers can crank out impressive piles of crushed rock or concrete in no time. But some projects—such as road construction and utility projects—can go faster by bringing the crusher to the work area, rather than having to transport material to a centrally located crusher. With output capacities ranging to hundreds of tons per hour, these powerful brutes can hold their own against larger, stationary machines by smoothly and efficiently reducing construction and demolition debris into pre-selected sizes for gravel, fill, or subsequent processing.

After input material is dumped into a hopper, it travels through a grizzly feeder, crusher jaws, and to a conveyor, which carries crushed material out of machine.

Getting Down to Business
After the mobile crusher is transported to the job site on a trailer, an operator maneuvers it into convenient positions under its own power—ready to work in spaces too tight for larger, more cumbersome crushers or inaccessible to crushers that must be towed or pushed into final position. Mobile crushers significantly increase productivity because the unit can move around a site to crush material wherever it is stockpiled, versus hauling material to a stationary crusher from several locations.

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